Surgical needs

Surgical Need in LMICs: The Hidden Burden

With this rapid shift of global disease burden to injuries and non-communicable diseases (NCDs), it remains important and necessary to turn global health attention towards developing intervention programmes and implementation strategies in prevention, early detection and timely intervention. However, there is still an enormous gap in the treatment options because only limited attention is being focused on surgical, obstetrical and anesthesia care, particularly in the context of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Despite the obvious need, there is presently no coordinated research or funding strategy to support the development of surgical and trauma care in LMICs, as opposed to the strategies that exist for infectious burdens such as HIV, TB and/or malaria.

Syrian refugees

Non-communicable diseases in refugee-hosting countries

The Syrian population is the largest refugee population in the world. Many of these refugees live in Turkey, which is the country that has welcomed the biggest amount of them. As refugees, Syrians have access to all basic social services, including healthcare services, but they still encounter many challenges. While Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs)- especially Diabetes Mellitus type II and hypertension – are the leading burden of disease for Syrians, the turkish health system focuses on infectious diseases. The integration of a new framework in their healthcare system with a baseline profile of the NCDs is crucially needed.

Las Kellys: occupational health self-organized fight

Occupation being one key determinant of health, insufficiently compensated employees impose challenges both for the industry and for the whole society. The burden they hold seems to be multifaceted as it falls disproportionately on workers who are further disadvantaged in society. Las Kellys is a group of hotel room cleaners that have organized themselves to fight for better working conditions in Spain. Through their successes, they have been a mirror of an access to health problem in the country, as well as an example on how approaching an issue with an intersectional approach can work under a self-organized movement.

Comprehensive Cleft Care in Low and Middle Income Countries

Comprehensive Cleft Care: The Key to Holistic Cleft Treatment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

In recent years, refinements in surgery, along with a better understanding of psychological, dental, nutritional and vocal needs of children born with cleft lip and/or palate, have greatly improved their quality of life. Comprehensive Cleft Care (CCC) is the integration of essential treatments beyond surgical care in cleft management, inclusive of nutritional counseling, orthodontic and general dental/oral care, speech therapy and psychosocial support. The fundamentals of cleft care are primarily dictated by the needs of patients and their families, as well as the capacity of healthcare facilities. Community based practitioners and primary care units make up the backbone of healthcare systems in LMICs. Therefore, early outreach activities remain the core of treatment goals in such settings.

africa concept map

Religious perspective on health: why western practitioners miss the mark in African public health

Effective public health interventions must be dynamic, extending beyond a clinical purview to address health inequities between the global north and south. Global health “involves many disciplines within and beyond the health sciences” and, therefore, should be able to account for and meet the needs of local populations by stepping Read more…